All The Books I Can Read

1 girl….2 many books!

Blog Tour Review: Catch Us The Foxes by Nicola West

on July 10, 2021

Catch Us The Foxes
Nicola West
Simon & Schuster AUS
2021, 384p
Copy courtesy of the publisher

Blurb {from the publisher/Goodreads.com}: Ambitious young journalist Marlowe ‘Lo’ Robertson would do anything to escape the suffocating confines of her small home town. While begrudgingly covering the annual show for the local paper, Lo is horrified to discover the mutilated corpse of Lily Williams, the reigning showgirl and Lo’s best friend. Seven strange symbols have been ruthlessly carved into Lily’s back. But when Lo reports her grisly find to the town’s police chief, he makes her promise not to tell anyone about the symbols. Lo obliges, though it’s not like she has much of a choice – after all, he is also her father.

When Lily’s murder makes headlines around the country and the town is invaded by the media, Lo seizes the opportunity to track down the killer and make a name for herself by breaking the biggest story of her life.

What Lo uncovers is that her sleepy home town has been harbouring a deadly secret, one so shocking that it will captivate the entire nation. Lo’s story will change the course of her life forever, but in a way she could never have dreamed of. 

This is a book that is going to really divide readers. It’s interesting, it’s twisted, it’s equal parts clever and frustrating and it’s definitely one where if you know someone that has read it, when you finish you’re definitely going to be hitting that person up to dissect it in great detail. For many, this will be a love it or hate it book.

It starts with Marlowe “Lo” Robertson about to do an appearance to promote her book about the murder of her best friend Lily Williams, which occurred about seven years earlier. Lo discovered Lily’s body in the stables of the carnival at the local show and is shocked when her father, the local police chief, asks her to keep quiet about what she feels are very important details. When someone delivers Lily’s journals to her, Lo is horrified to discover that the town might be hiding something incredibly sinister – and that some of the most powerful citizens are in on it.

This book is full of twists and turns that will make you query everything. Whenever you think you have the mystery figured out and you definitely know what is happening now and who is doing what, you’ll read something else two pages later that will recalibrate everything and then you’re definitely sure that you know what is happening! There’s a lot about this that is written really well – it’s very much a story where you can’t trust anything anyone is telling you and the narrator becomes more unreliable as the book goes on. The fact that this is a ‘book within a book’ allows the author some liberties with the telling and it’s the sort of story where you need to query everything you learn because chances are, it’s going to be completely different in a few pages anyway!

I enjoyed this – and I found it a riveting read that definitely kept me engaged and I very much wanted to learn what the truth was, and what had really happened to Lily and why. Because there were quite a few scenarios presented and each one would’ve brought about a very different outcome for many of the people we were introduced to in the book. But…..I did have a few issues with the story and I felt that there were things that felt a little glossed over or didn’t perhaps have the sort of impact that they should have.

Firstly, I’m pretty surprised the author chose to use a real place as the setting in this book, because she’s not kind to it. There’s very little positivity in the portrayal of the town at all – and it’s a well known town, quite popular with tourists and day trippers (both of which also attract some scorn) but the worst of it is probably reserved for some of the powerful men in town and the rampant misogyny and blatantly homophobic behaviour. And then of course there’s the suggestion of potentially sinister behaviour happening and everyone turning a blind eye to it, or being complicit. I thought something of this nature would’ve been better in a made up town, even if it was clearly based on a particular town. I just thought it was an odd choice, and I know small towns can be incredibly constricting and difficult – the amount of desperation from Lo in wanting to get out (then why didn’t she?) and the criticism of those that didn’t, felt weirdly bitter without much in the way of actual reason.

The other thing that made me really uncomfortable was the ending – not because of the way it ended, I was all for that choice and the twists and turns that got the reader to the final answer. It was more the fact that the author took something heavily stigmatised and had her characters pretend they weren’t, in order to use it as a scapegoat that benefited them and suited their narrative and allowed them to continue on. Now I mentioned this to a blogger friend of mine who suggested it may have been a commentary on how such things are still stigmatised and even when people are saying not to, there’s still a strong trend towards burying it or using it if possible and that could be the case – the author could be using this a social commentary on this. Or they could not be. It just detracted from everything for me – I think you’re supposed to think how cold, but all I could really think was how unnecessary to make this thing your cover for the big bad.

Occasionally I had trouble believing that Lo was in her 20s – the narration often made her seem quite a bit younger but I don’t know how much of that was the writing or it was what the author was intending. The nature of the the way the story is told means that as I said, you can’t take anything imparted to be anything other than the intentional way that the story was chosen to be presented. It makes for an odd read at times, as you try to pick out what might not have occurred precisely the way you’re being told it did.

A very different read – I don’t think everyone will enjoy it but I thought that for the most part, it was engaging and clever and full of twists and turns that will mean you won’t know what happened until almost the last page. And even then you’ll question what you know!

7/10

Book #117 of 2021

Catch Us The Foxes is book #50 of the Australian Women Writers Challenge for 2021 – and with this title, I successfully complete the goal I set for myself, to read 50 books. I’m pretty sure I can get to 80 before the year is out.


One response to “Blog Tour Review: Catch Us The Foxes by Nicola West

  1. Mic says:

    Fantastic review as always. I quite agree, I read this book a while back and enjoyed it. I haven’t even attempted a review yet. And not sure I could now.
    Was definitely different and kept you on your toes.

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