All The Books I Can Read

1 girl….2 many books!

Guest Post: Australian Author Fiona McArthur

on June 24, 2015

McArthur, Fiona, credit Carolyn Guichard3

Today I am thrilled to welcome Aussie romance author Fiona McArthur back to the blog. Fiona was here last year for a Q&A on all things reading, writing and life and now returns to share a little about her newest novel, The Homestead Girls and the inspiration for including the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) in the story.

***

Flying Doctors

The Homestead Girls is a story about five women and the background is about medical retrieval in the outback. I’ve dedicated the book, with much sincerity, to the wonderful people who work for and support the Royal Flying Doctor Service, because, like every Australian, I’ve always greatly admired those who meet the needs of those far-flung families who live away from the medical facilities of the city.

One of the women characters is an experienced flight nurse – I do have a friend who is one, one becomes the flying doctor she’s always wanted to be – have met and spoken to several, one used to be a bush nurse and helps raise money for the cause, and one has her closest relative saved by the service – so it’s a story that touches on how the flying doctor service can work.

Real stories of medical retrieval by the flying doctors touch us and a lot of it is the humility and appreciation of those who have been saved. So many times it’s hard working, unpretentious people in extremely remote areas who are used to managing with their own resources, those who never ask for assistance but offer it selflessly, who might need that urgent rescue. RFDS makes it their job to help those people and a whole lot more. It could be a grey nomad and his wife involved in an accident, a mum in an outback community in premature labour or a child with a snake bite. All people who need to travel from a remote outpost to a larger hospital in what could be a matter of life or death.

If you do travel to Longreach, Charleville, Kalgoorlie, Alice Springs, Broken Hill or Dubbo then drop into the RFDS visitor centres because the statistics and stories and history of the service is fascinating and inspiring.

You can read a story, there’s hundreds of them, that will thicken your throat and blur your vision when you look up case a history from the RFDS Stories like ‘Fuzz’s, here. http://www.flyingdoctor.org.au/News.html?NewSite=1&ItemID=891&count=1

Fuzz knew his heart was probably going to stop. Just imagine him telling his mate to strap that AED onto his chest in case they’d have to use it. I’m certainly going to use it in my next book. Not because it’s dramatic and almost unbelievable, but because I admire Fuzz, who has probably saved other people’s lives, for not only thinking of himself, he was worried about his mate and how his mate would feel if he couldn’t keep Fuzz alive until that plane landed. Go Fuzz, and go his mate who did CPR until Fuzz regained consciousness, but unless Fuzz was retrieved to a large hospital by the RFDS for surgery he would have died.

The Royal Flying Doctor Service is only partly funded by the government. It runs on donations from individuals, groups and fund-raising activities, and when you run down the list of people, and what they do to raise that $20 million funds every year, it’s humbling.

An example is Operation Pudding that the senior bush ladies from around Broken Hill come together for every year. The way these women gather, some travelling hundreds of kilometres, to cook for a week and how every single one of those Christmas Puddings are snapped up, not just because it’s a secret recipe and the best pudding in the world, but because people are supporting the RFDS.

Money is raised by sponsored car rally’s, circumnavigating cyclists and women walking the Kakoda Trail, though it’s the RFDS tin that sits in every hairdresser, pub and shop in the outback towns that quietly accumulates, too. So if you see a tin, or a fundraiser, smile, share a thought for the people you can help, and be generous and be thankful, Australia, in all her vastness, has the Royal Flying Doctor Service.

***

I found the RFDS really interesting in The Homestead Girls, there’s so much to consider when staffing and running an organisation that relies on planes to access its patients. I’ll have a review of The Homestead Girls up on the blog later today so make sure you check back for that! Thanks again for stopping by, Fiona.

9780143799825

 

 

Advertisements

One response to “Guest Post: Australian Author Fiona McArthur

  1. […] Guest Post: Australian Author Fiona McArthur Jun […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: